Foodbuzz 24, 24, 24: An Orphan’s Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving table, taken by 5chw4r7zMy friends are my family.

I don’t have a lot of family; neither does Terry.  His is in Alabama; mine is here, but we’re not close.  Since Thanksgiving is Terry’s favorite holiday, last year, we decided to have my mom over for dinner.  Then we found out my friend Kasmira and her husband didn’t have plans for Thanksgiving, nor did my mom’s friend… nor did another friend, Drake.  So we made a big meal, people brought things, we drank and were merry and Terry and I deemed it the best Thanksgiving we’d had in a long, long time.

This year, we decided that we had so much fun that we’d have to do it again.  I’ve met so many people this year– through the blog and through other venues– that I just talked up Thanksgiving and put the word out that I’d take anyone who didn’t have family in town, didn’t want to go out of town, or just didn’t want to deal with family this year.  We ended up with a guest list including a ton of local bloggers and Twitter fans, a bunch of foodies, and old friends who came together like one big family Thursday night.

Terry and I originally planned on making the whole dinner ourselves, but everyone we invited wanted to contribute to the meal.  It’s more fun that way, anyway– every family has its own traditions, and everyone has their “must haves”.  Terry’s “must haves” were the relish tray, his mother’s chicken and cornbread dressing, and a smoked turkey.  My “must haves” were green bean casserole and dressing with sage. My friend Maureen is vegan.  You get the idea.  There was no Martha Stewart-perfect meal here, but instead one that was varied, diverse, and made with a lot of love.  Oh, and a lot of bloggers.  Almost all of our guests (save Drake, my coworker Steve and his wife, and my mom) are people we met because of this very blog and who have their own blogs or are on Twitter. Strangely enough, no one really Tweeted from the event– we were having too good a time.

Special thanks must go to my friend Bob, who generously let me use some of his pictures of the event, in addition to my own.  I was far too busy running around to take a lot of pictures (though I did take a few).  I appreciate it, Bob!

We started off with appetizers– hummus, a relish tray, and Terry’s favorite goat cheese dip (this recipe is close to the original Southern Living recipe; add 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese to make the version we make.  I also use light cream cheese instead of regular cream cheese.  As if that makes some huge caloric difference).  Ms 5chw4r7z made a roasted red pepper dip, and Drake brought a goat cheese log.  I’m not entirely sure how any of us had room for dinner as we snacked and drank wine, beer and the yummy Manhattans Kate made (and she later educated us about bourbon.  Ask her sometime, it’s truly fascinating!).

The turkey was a lot of fun to make.  Terry mentioned that at one point he made a smoked turkey that involved a lot of butter and a rub.  I ran with that, making some lemon compound butter, stuffing it under the skin of the turkey, and rubbing the turkey all over with garlic, chili powder, cumin, and agave nectar before Terry smoked it in our courtyard.  He used big chunks of hickory with beer and apple juice in the water bowl.  The turkey was amazing: super moist and juicy, and everyone raved– and Bob carved (I didn’t want to, Terry didn’t know how, and Bob volunteered. Brave guy.  At least my knife was sharp…)!

Side dishes were a little complicated.  Terry made his mother’s chicken and cornbread dressing (which has no sage and a lot of onions) and I made my dressing, which is a riff off of my grandma’s.  Hers was a loaf of dressed-up Stove Top.  Mine is made with pane toscano and a lot of onions and fresh sage.  I made two versions– vegan and “regular”, which contained butter.  I thought the vegan version turned out better (and that’s what most people seemed to eat), so here’s the recipe:

Julie’s Dressed-Up Dressing

1 loaf crusty bread, such as pane toscano or boule, torn into pieces

2 cups vegetable stock

2 cloves garlic, finely minced

2 onions, chopped

4 stalks celery, chopped

5-6 leaves sage, finely chopped

1/2 cup dried cranberries

1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted

salt and pepper to taste

3 tablespoons Earth Balance margarine, plus extra for topping the casserole

Preheat oven to 325.  Saute onions and mushrooms in margarine until softened.  Add garlic and sage, and saute until fragrant.  In a large bowl, mix bread, pine nuts and cranberries until combined.  Add onion mixture and broth and mix until everything is evenly moistened.  Pour into a greased baking pan and top with 5-6 small chunks of margarine.  You can then refrigerate this until needed (allow to come to room temperature before baking), or bake immediately at 325 for 30 minutes, until the top is golden brown.

I also made two different kinds of green bean casserole– one vegan and one not.  The only change I made to these recipes is topping them with fried onions, omitting the breadcrumbs.  Maureen loved the vegan version, and everyone else loved the non-vegan version.  I’ll definitely be making the non-vegan one again.

Terry made a relish tray (Big Olives, Little Pickles), the dressing (which I will write up at a later date, as it takes some translation and deciphering from a very old piece of paper) and Lime Nut Chill, also known as “the Green Thing”.  Southerners love any combination of jello, Cool Whip, and fruit, and this is a dish, though not fancy, that takes Terry back to the happy moments of his childhood.

Terry’s Green Thing

1 package lime jello, dissolved in 1 cup boiling water

1 8-oz block cream cheese

1 cup cold water

2 16-oz cans crushed pineapple

1 cup chopped pecans

1 8-oz package Cool Whip, or 1 cup whipped cream

Mix dissolved jello with cream cheese and cold water.  Beat until well dissolved (a mixer would do a good job of making this fluffy).  Add the pineapple, pecans, and whipped cream or Cool Whip and mix until combined.  Pour into a serving dish and chill for 2 hours or overnight.

I nearly forgot– I made sweet potato casserole.  I’m somewhat famous for this.  My sweet potatoes are the kind of sweet potatoes that make people who don’t like them change their mind.  It’s good enough for dessert, I swear.

Julie’s Sweet Potato Casserole

5 pounds sweet potatoes

4 oz butter

1/2 cup brown sugar

1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  Pierce sweet potatoes and bake until soft, about 45 minutes.  Put a baking pan underneath to catch any sugars that will invariably seep out and burn.  Allow to cool.  Remove skins from sweet potatoes, and mash in a large bowl.  Add butter and seasonings and mix until combined, but still chunky.  Pour into buttered baking dish and top with crumb topping, which follows.  Lower temperature to 350 and bake 30 minutes, or until the top is golden brown.  Simply substitute margarine for butter for a vegan version.

Topping:

1/2 cup butter (or margarine)

1 cup brown sugar

3/4 cup flour

3/4 cup old-fashioned oatmeal

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup walnuts, chopped

Mix all ingredients except for walnuts together until a large, chunky crumb is formed– it’s easiest to do this with a fork or your fingers.  Mix in walnuts, and use to top casserole.  It also works well as a crumb topping for pies.

Jeff brought glazed pork belly and bacon-cheddar biscuits, which were yummy.  He also contributed a chocolate torte, which was deemed “sinful” by  my mom.  In addition to the Manhattans, Kate brought some delicious bourbon-laced cranberry sauce.  Bob, our intrepid photographer and turkey-carver, baked an Apple Cider Pie (which he documented here).  Craig, AKA Vudutu, and his lovely girlfriend Donna brought an apple-fennel salad.  Maureen and Mandy brought vegan gravy, succotash and Quorn cutlets.  Steve and Amita brought bread, and Mom brought champagne and a lot of funny stories.  The pecan and pumpkin pies were from Bonbonerie (I had no time to bake!).  Krista pretended that she hadn’t celebrated Thanksgiving a few months earlier. Everything turned out great.  As Jeff said, “I would have been content with toast and popcorn, the company was that good.”  And it was.

Mooch approved.

I think this Thanksgiving was even better than last year:  more people, more fun, more laughter, and (if it’s possible) more drinking.  I can’t wait to do this again next year– with friends old and new.

P.S.– Kate has video of Bob carving, which I refuse to watch.  Refuse, I tell you.

P.P.S– if you want Jeff’s recipe for glazed pork belly, go here.

  • http://www.queercincinnati.com QueerCincinnati

    Sounds like you guys had a blast! So jealous I did not get the chance to join. :-( But, so much love and thankfulness for you… to new friends, really.

    Keep me on the guest list and I’ll see what I can do about Orphans’ 2009.

  • http://www.queercincinnati.com QueerCincinnati

    PS I don’t do a lot of cooking — I’m a single male (I may be a queen, but I’m still a bachelor in his 20s), so my contribution to any future endeavor may be limited to a plate of cookies and cube cheese. :-) At least it’s not CheezWhiz.

  • http://www.mommybits.net Shannanb aka Mommy Bits

    I love this. When I was in college and before I was married my friends and I did this. Some of my favorite memories came from those thanksgiving dinners. Those friends were my family.

  • http://getinmahbelly.blogspot.com liz

    fun! it looks like you guys had an awesome meal. i do friend thanksgiving every year in various locations and it is so much more fun, relaxing, and stress free than spending it with family. and pot luck style is so much better than having one person do all the work. everything looks delicious!

  • http://www.katesrandommusings.com Kate

    What a fantastic post! Thank you so much for including me in the festivities! I had a fantastic time and yes – the company is truly what mae the evening spectacular. And you are so generous to share your treasured recipes! xo

  • http://www.adorkandhispork.com Jeff

    Just wanted to thank you one more time for the tremendous food and hospitality. And sin, I hasten to add, is relative.

  • http://www.kimberly-myself.blogspot.com Kim

    That looks like fun! Glad you had a great time. I love the title of the post.

  • http://myinflammatorywrit.com kari

    Your Thanksgiving looked about 298349832942 times better than mine. My mother in law’s idea of T-day is Butterball turkey with fakey frozen vegetables that come in a bag with “butter flavor”, dry stuffing, and lumpy mash. Thank god we brought cake!

  • Susan

    Wow, my family loves the “Green thing”. They also make an orange variation of it sometimes. We’re from just a bit South of St. Louis and I never realized how southern that dish was…

  • http://5chw4r7z.com 5chw4r7z

    Thanks again for inviting us over, we had a blast, ate and drank too much, everything Thanksgiving should be.

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  • http://www.huggingthecoast.com Hugging the Coast

    Looks like your guests were very lucky….nice spread!!! BTW, I’ve just added your 24, 24, 24 link to my blog post.

  • http://liberalfoodie.blogspot.com/ LiberalFoodie

    fun! I wish we could have stayed here for the holiday. We traveled 10 hours to New Jersey to spend time with the family, only to find out we were having vegetarian Indian food on Thanksgiving. Good but it didn’t fill my turkey and mashed potato craving.

  • http://www.norecipes.com Marc @ NoRecipes

    Great idea! Your turkey sounds delicious. I wish I had a smoker!

  • http://litwincorp.com Tangert Alisander

    Hello people, it’s Thanksgiving Day! I’m happy with my extra day off, and I am planning to make something fun that will probably involve a bike ride and seeing something new in Cheyenne I haven’t seen yet.
    You write something new at Thanksgiving?

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